Twitter Culture -organizational culture and structure

The study of organizing, the second of the four functions in the management process, begins with the study of organizational culture and structure, which managers must determine so as to implement a particular strategy. Organizational culture consists of the set of shared, taken-for-granted, implicit assumptions that a group holds in the workplace. Organizational structure describes who reports to whom and who does what. Read the case below and answer the questions that follow. In the past, prospective employees were attracted to companies because of prestige, a sense of security (monetary or otherwise), and a chance for mobility within the company. While these aspects of a company are still points of interest to employees, new features have to be considered as well. As Millennials enter the workforce, companies are finding that flexibility and open communication are important to keep this group of influential workers satisfied. While the media has painted the picture that new companies controlled by Millennials are ones with trifling benefits, such as video games in the break room, beanbag chairs in the office, and lax dress codes, these features may be a result of the company, rather than the culture, and that is a good thing. With the development of new and innovative companies that operate on digital platforms, it makes sense that corporate culture is drastically different than companies in the past. For example, let’s take a look at Twitter. By examining Twitter’s company platform, it is clear that the company values communication. Twitter’s users voice their opinions freely and often passionately, so why shouldn’t Twitter’s employees do the same? Twitter encourages open communication between employees by holding team meetings on the roof. These roof meetings allow employees to relax and speak to each other as equals. In addition, Twitter takes the time to acknowledge the importance of each individual employee. For example, Elizabeth Weil, Twitter’s Head of Culture, hand writes welcome notes on her private stationary to each new Twitter employee. These personal gestures from the company make each employee feel like a valued member of the team. As company culture becomes more and more important to employees, companies must make sure that their culture fits their company. Imagine Twitter employees sitting at office desks working in a strict command and control environment. It just wouldn’t work. Companies must be sure to align their culture with the company and in turn, employees must align themselves with the culture.

6a. Twitter’s organizational culture most …

Twitter’s organizational culture most resembles a(n) ______ culture.

Adhocracy

Hierarchy

Clan

Competitive

Market

6b. Hand-written welcome notes are an example of…

Hand-written welcome notes are an example of:

Core values

Enacted values

Espoused values

Basic assumptions

Observable artifacts

6c. Employees apply their individual efforts in …

Employees apply their individual efforts in a ______ to fulfill a common purpose.

Delegation

Chain of command

Division of labor

Unity of command

Coordinated effort

6d. If Twitter were to exclusively use email, c…

If Twitter were to exclusively use e-mail, collaborative computing, and other computer connections to connect geographically separate employees, it would be considered a(n) ______ organization.

Computer

Geographic

Targeted

Virtual

Invisible

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